Browser Immediately Closes When Debugging

I recently ran into an issue while developing, that it looks like many others have experienced as well. A search didn't provide a good resolution to the problem. However, I was able to fix it and with a far easier solution than many articles I'd read. The Problem The problem occurred when I started a … Continue reading Browser Immediately Closes When Debugging


XML Comment on ‘X’ Has CRef Attribute That Could Not Be Resolved

The generic collections in the System.Collections.Generic namespace get the "generic" moniker from their ability to mold themselves to fit the type you're working with. Within the definition of the generic collections this generic type is generally specified with a "". Well, the XML comment system also needs a type specifier to match up with the generic object's definition. In XML comments we can't use the less-than () characters so we instead use curly braces ({ and }). If you update all of the XML references that are throwing the error described above to have "{T}" at the end, the XML comment system will recognize it and resolve the error. If you have a Dictionary or other generic type, simply include the generic type characters appropriate to that definition. For instance the Dictionary object has a key and value so I simply put "{K,V}" after its definition.

Use Assembly Title, Description, Company, Copyright, Version in C#

When you edit the properties of a project in Visual Studio, you can enter a Title, Description, Company, Copyright and Version in the Assembly Information section. The question becomes, how do you use these in a project so that you have a single source of information? In this article I'll walk you through the steps used to access the assembly information so you can easily use it throughout your application.

C# WMI Tutorial

This tutorial will provide a step-by-step process to follow in order to use WMI. It will provide information about the tools you need, how to use them and finally how to code to get information from WMI.

Extended Methods in .NET

Extended methods are incredibly useful for adding functionality that .NET doesn't come stock with. They allow you to quickly extend existing classes without having to create new derived types, recompile or extend existing types! Just add, import their namespace and "magically" all instances of the type you extended contain the new methods. Seriously powerful stuff!